Adult Bullying and Mr McCampbell

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Stop Roy F McCampbell!

Adult bullying is a serious problem, and may require legal action. Like the legal action that should have been taken against Roy McCampbell years ago! Some have said that this blog is a form of bullying, however I disagree and even if the perception of bullying exists by some these pages and posts are a necessary response to a man who wrote the book on targeted career annihilation through the use of social media.

Bullying is the use of force, threat, or coercion to abuse, intimidate, or aggressively dominate others. Roy F McCampbell conducts all of these attacks, and regularly directed at the school district and its staff! The behavior is often repeated and habitual. He has repeated these activities in all aspects of his life, and continues to this day. One essential prerequisite is the perception, by the bully or by others, of an imbalance of social or physical power. Its all about social imbalance with Mr McCampbell and the perception of his victim status. Behaviors used to assert such domination can include verbal harassment He does this often or threat, He regularly threatens legal action to creat fear to force his agenda physical assault or coercion This has yet to happen, but you should not be surprised, and I would be prepaired for a break from reality at any moment judging from public observations, and such acts may be directed repeatedly towards particular targets. Such as the special education staff, the superintendent of schools, and any teacher his children have had or have Justifications and rationalizations for such behavior sometimes include differences of social class, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, appearance, behavior, body language, personality, reputation, lineage, strength, size or ability.[1][2] If bullying is done by a group, it is called mobbing.[3] “Targets” of bullying are also sometimes referred to as “victims” of bullying. Just like the victims of a narcissist.

The serial bully displays behavior congruent with many of the diagnostic criteria for Narcissistic Personality Disorder. Characterized by a pervasive pattern of grandiosity and self-importance, need for admiration, and lack of empathy, people with narcissistic personality disorder overestimate their abilities and inflate their accomplishments, often appearing boastful and pretentious, whilst correspondingly underestimating and devaluing the achievements and accomplishments of others.

Often a potential narcissist like Mr McCampbell will fraudulently claim to have qualifications or experience or affiliations or associations which they don’t have or aren’t entitled to. Belief in superiority, inflating their self-esteem to match that of senior or important people with whom they associate or identify, insisting on having the “top” professionals or being affiliated with the “best” institutions, but criticizing the same people who disappoint them are also common features of narcissistic personality disorder. The Narcissist may also offer to help others with their problems or issues claiming their extensive experience will be priceless, when in reality those experiences in time have alienated almost every person he has come in contact with.

One would think that as people mature and progress through life, that they would stop behaviors of their youth. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. Sadly, adults can be bullies, just as children and teenagers can be bullies. While adults are more likely to use verbal bullying as opposed to physical bullying, the fact of the matter is that adult bullying exists. The goal of an adult bully is to gain power over another person, and make himself or herself the dominant adult. They try to humiliate victims, and “show them who is boss.”

There are several different types of adult bullies, and it helps to know how they operate:

  1. Narcissistic Adult Bully: This type of adult bully is self-centered and does not share empathy with others. Additionally, there is little anxiety about consequences. He or she seems to feel good about him or herself, but in reality has a brittle narcissism that requires putting others down.
  2. Impulsive Adult Bully: Adult bullies in this category are more spontaneous and plan their bullying out less. Even if consequences are likely, this adult bully has a hard time restraining his or her behavior. In some cases, this type of bullying may be unintentional, resulting in periods of stress, or when the bully is actually upset or concerned about something unconnected with the victim.
  3. Physical Bully: While adult bullying rarely turns to physical confrontation, there are, nonetheless, bullies that use physicality. In some cases, the adult bully may not actually physically harm the victim, but may use the threat of harm, or physical domination through looming. Additionally, a physical bully may damage or steal a victim’s property, rather than physically confronting the victim.
  4. Verbal Adult Bully: Words can be quite damaging. Adult bullies who use this type of tactic may start rumors about the victim, or use sarcastic or demeaning language to dominate or humiliate another person. This subtle type of bullying also has the advantage – to the bully – of being difficult to document. However, the emotional and psychological impacts of verbal bullying can be felt quite keenly and can result in reduced job performance and even depression.
  5. Secondary Adult Bully: This is someone who does not initiate the bullying, but joins in so that he or she does not actually become a victim down the road. Secondary bullies may feel bad about what they are doing, but are more concerned about protecting themselves.

Workplace bullying can make life quite miserable and difficult. Supervisors or administrators should be made aware of adult bullies, since they can disrupt productivity, create a hostile work environment (opening the company or school district to the risk of a law suit) and reduce morale.

It is important to note, though, that there is little you can do about an adult bully, other than ignore and try to avoid, after reporting the abuse to a supervisor. This is because adult bullies are often in a set pattern. They are not interested in working things out and they are not interested in compromise. Rather, adult bullies are more interested in power and domination. They want to feel as though they are important and preferred, and they accomplish this by bringing others down. There is very little you can do to change an adult bully, beyond working within the confines of laws and company regulations that are set up. The good news is that, if you can document the bullying, there are legal and civil remedies for harassment, abuse and other forms of bullying. But you have to be able to document the case. In Mr McCampbell’s case he documented his own bullying of the school district, and members of this community in his blog posts, and social media activities. He has since tried to hide all of it in an effort to establish a bullying complaint against this blog, but the evidence still exists.

Adult bullies were often either bullies as children, or bullied as children. Understanding this about them may be able to help you cope with the behavior. But there is little you can do about it beyond doing your best to ignore the bully, report his or her behavior to the proper authorities, and document the instances of bullying so that you can take legal action down the road if necessary.

STAND UP

AND SPEAK OUT!

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